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A Shocking Diagnosis Produces One of the Author’s Most Memorable Novels to Date

50 HOURS by Loree Lough

If ever a book was predestined to be written by an individual, it was 50 HOURS by best-selling author Loree Lough. You will indeed find a piece of the author in between each page. Loree, healthy at the time she was commissioned to write the novel, was diagnosed with a similar terminal illness as her main character! The shocking diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma allowed her to write one of her most memorable novels to date. It is not by any means a depressing story that smacks of defeat or worse self-pity, but of all things, is a story of redemption, peace, second chances, friendship, forgiveness and of course, LOVE!

The famous novelist Catherine Lanigan of Romancing the Stone, Jewel of the Nile, and a multitude of other works, wrote, “This is the kind of book that wins Pulitzer prizes,” the highest compliment for any literary fiction novel.

Loree, admittedly, found it challenging at times to write 50 HOURS and early on confessed to Kevin James O’Neill, the screenplay writer the novel is based upon and a movie producer, that she wasn’t sure if she could handle the story or workload. However, for over a year and a half, through twice-daily chemo, plus a stem cell transplant, Loree could not get the characters out of her head and had the overwhelming desire to finish the novel. Wanting more than ever to show readers whose lives had been touched by this dreaded disease, cancer, that, “There’s always plenty of reason to hope and have something to be thankful for,” Loree forged ahead.

The realization that millions of others were facing the same prognosis as her self and her main character, Loree decided to put one foot in front of the other and keep moving forward. For her, it was cathartic, and she hoped it would be for her readers—not just cancer patients and their families—too. Loree has always believed she was fairly tough; living by the “Never let ’em see ya sweat” and “Never let ’em see ya cry” codes, and continued to think that way as she poured her heart and soul into her novel through her characters Aubrey, Franco, and Dusty.

Aubrey is living with the constant knowledge that her life is slowly ebbing to an end, but she’s determined to squeeze as much joy from every precious moment she has left. Still, she’s lonely, exhausted, and no matter how hard she tries to hide it, terrified! Meeting Franco gives Aubrey a thread of hope to grasp onto, as she realizes that her long-held dream of painting autumn, in of all places Savannah, has come true with his help. Franco, burdened by the belief that he’s partially responsible for the car wreck that killed his wife, turned him into a man who eked out his existence by merely putting one foot in front of the other because he doesn’t know what else to do. After meeting Aubrey, whose zest for life is infectious, his 50 hours of community service tick by, as he finds himself drawn to her strength.

Loree found herself putting words into Aubrey’s mouth, that she’d only ever said in the privacy of her own mind. Talking with her fellow patients proved she wasn’t alone: A lot of cancer patients keep things to themselves. They do it to spare their loved ones, already worried and afraid of an uncertain future, who aren’t entirely sure or know how to comfort their loved ones. Through Aubrey, Loree was able to tell them that she expected nothing, quite literally, except to be with them (her family and friends). It isn’t easy watching someone you care about suffering the side effects of drugs and treatments. Loree, through Aubrey, showed friends and family that she appreciated their steadfastness. Aubrey’s relationship with Franco and her mother helped her make that point.

Her research and interviews proved there are far too many “loved ones” like Aubrey’s ex-husband; Michael who put on a good show of being the dutiful spouse…until the condition, like Aubrey’s, deteriorated, taking the spotlight off him and putting it back on her. It’s an ugly fact, but a fact nonetheless: The occasional loved one will leave. Through Aubrey, Loree hoped to show cancer patients and family members alike that they can survive even that!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Once upon a time, best-selling author Loree Lough (literally) sang for her supper, performing before packed audiences throughout the U.S. Now and then, she blows the dust from her 6-string to croon a tune or two for her grandchildren but mostly, she just writes full time. Over the years, her stories have earned nearly 100 industry and “Readers’ Choice” awards, 7 movie options, and over eighty 4- and 5-star reviews. There are NEARLY seven million copies of Loree’s books in circulation, and by year-end of 2018, she’ll have 119 books (fiction and non-fiction for kids and adults) 72 short stories, 2,500+ articles in print. Loree shares her [i]learned-the-hard-way[/i] lessons about the craft and the industry, and her comedic approach makes her a favorite (and frequent) guest of writers’ organizations, book clubs, private and government institutions, college and high school writing programs both here and abroad. A writer who believes in “giving back,” Loree dedicates a portion of her income to Soldiers’ Angels, Special Operations Warrior Foundation, and other worthwhile organizations. She splits her time between her home in the Baltimore suburbs and a cabin in the Allegheny Mountains, and shares both with her real-life hero Larry, who rarely complains, even when she adds yet another item to her vast collection of lighthouses, wind chimes, and “wolf stuff.”

Spreading the word about this book increases the opportunity for Kevin James O’Neill to take make it a feature film as intended. Royalties from 50 HOURS go toward Cancer Research. Specifically, the Multiple Myeloma ResearchFoundation.

50 HOURS is available wherever books are sold including Amazon

Barnes and Noble 
Publisher Progressive Rising Phoenix Press
For media, author interview, and review copy requests contact the publisher: contact@progressiverisingphoenix.com

BOOK TRAILER FOR 50 HOURS

Article Copyright © 2018 by Amanda M. Thrasher 

 

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Article, books, JD Holiday, publishing, Writing Process

Putting a book cover together by JD Holiday

9780981861425-PerfecColor wTextPicBack MatterFOR bLOG]_bakTo put a bookcover together you need to make a template or get one from your

print company. This is a mock-up of the one I got from my printer. The cover must extend to the

outer lines of the template in order for the book to have the trim line which gives the book its

nice neat final look. In other words, the whole area of the template must have the book’s cover color in it, back and front. The area right inside the outer line is called the Bleed area which is cut off at the second line in on the template all the way around the bookcover. That will be the actual book size when it is done.

The front of the book is on your right hand side and the back cover is on the left side.

The spine is the middle area between the back and front covers. The spine size is based on the number of pages and the paper size of the book and that is calulated by the printer.

The red lines (a 1/2 inch from the trim line) on both the covers is the area you must keep all text and graphics in.

~~~~~

Next I painted the front cover and top part of the back cover in Corel Painter Essentials

Then I brought the cover into Indesign CS 3 to work.

~~~~~~

I used Indesign CS 3 to create my book and cover, though I do most of the artwork in art/graphic software.

This is a example of a text frame which using the Text Tool you put in the template and do your typing.

You use the Selection Tool to resize the Text frame when needed by grabbing any of the small squares around the frame and dragging it. You can also copy and paste your text from your word processor into the text frames.

For graphics you would go to File> Place find your picture on your computer (tif) and click Open.

The Selection Tool in Indesign will become loaded and you just click the place in your template or frame that you want the picture or graphic to go.

I rotated the cover to the left and typed in the spine text.

Adding all the items needed  I created the book’s cover!

Article, author, Fiction, JD Holiday, Writing Process

The Write Dream by J.D. Holiday

Permit your dreams to see the daylight. ~ by Bernard Kelvin Clive

   

           So you don’t think you can write but you have thoughts that could be a story. You can imagine how a scene or two would work. Come on, we all have those times when a story could start with a thought. An imagining. A daydream or even a nightmare. So what’s holding you back?

              Is it your horrible spelling, grammar and maybe it’s you lack of understanding of writing techiques.

              I believe the best tool at your disposal is reading. Read what interest you. Read what you enjoy and especially read the genres you think you would like to write in.

              While reading other author’s books or ones written by your favorite authors, pay attention to how the book is written. From good books you can see what you should do and what you shouldn’t. Learning the skill of writing is in the soaking up of techiques and putting that and your imagined story all into your own words. You want to learn how to show your readers your story using scenes you write so they can feel like they are there in the story with your characters.

              Writers write to express who they are and to tell what they know, to teach and share the stories they see clearly in their imagination. Some write to purge unhappiness or injustices for themselves and others, to entertain themselves first, and then, those readers who find their works. Writing takes you away from your own reality, to places you create. You can forget your immeditate problem taking a brake from it when you write, or read. Use what you know from your life in your stories. If you are writing for children use your childhood and think back to it. Think like you did when you were a kid. I write out my scenes as I see them in my minds eye, and make an outline that I update as I go along.

              You can always get help with spelling, punctuation and grammar. You can always pay someone to edit for you. You should invest in a good dictionary, thesaurus, and books on grammar and writing whether you find them on online sites or books that sit on your desk along side of you, or both.

              So if you have a story to tell, invest some, and read a lot. Give it a go and write it. If you haven’t tried before, the whole experience might take you places you might like.

The best book I’ve read about writing is:

HOW TO WRITE SHORT STORIES by Sharon Sorenson

This book is amount the most valuable books I own. Even if you think you will not be writing short stories you might find that writing chapters is like writing short stories.

The Only Grammar Book You’ll Ever Need: A One-Stop Source for Every Writing Assignment https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1580628559/ 

 

 ~  © 2016 JD Holiday

History, JD Holiday, writer's life, Writing Process

A Short Look at Typewriter History. NO, Really! In A NutShell.

Enter a caption

In A Nut Shell!

In A Nut Shell!

 

 
 

 A Short Look at

       Typewriter History

       by J.D. Holiday

Another Stoles’ Prototype

              I have always loved history of all types. It’s usually inventions that I take the time to look at.

Sholes’ One Key Prototype

I know, most people find this of no interest. But what can I say, I think if someone takes the time to come up with anything that would make others lives easier, they deserve to be admired. Even if it’s just by me!

             You might not believe this, but there are quite a lot of articles written about the typewriter.

I found some articles that say that it all started in the 1900’s when Christopher Latham Sholes, whose work on the typewriter is undisputed, asked for carbon paper at the Milwaulee Wisconsin Telegraph Company to use with his early gizmo he, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule would called the ‘typewriting machine’ in 1867.

                                                                                        A Christopher Latham Sholes’s machine

           As with many inventions that we so take for granted; the telegraph, the automobile, and telephones to name three, many people contributed to the invention of the typewriter. And many of these machines were listed as the ‘first typewriter,’ and almost all were slower than handwriting!

          I found that the whole invention really goes back as far as the fourteenth century. But in 1575, Francesco Rampazzetto, an Italian printmaker, invented a machine to impress letters in papers. And in 1714 the first patent was issued by Henry Mill, an English engineer. Many printing or typing machines were patented by inventors throughout the centuries. All those who worked on its invention that leads up to the present day took no less than one hundred prototype and more that 50 inventors worldwide. Amazing! Will we ever know all of these inventors names?

These Italians are among them:

              In 1802, Agostino Fantoni developed a particular typewriter to enable his blind sister to write.

Pellegrino Turri machine

              In 1808, Pellegrino Turri invented a typewriter along with carbon paper to provide the ink for it.

              In 1823, Pietro Conti di Cilavegna invented a different model called the tachigrafo or tachitipo.

              And then in 1829, William Austin Burt patented a machine. This machine used a dial rather than keys called an ‘index typewriter’ so unlike the other keyboard typewriters. He was never to find a buyer and the invention was never produced.

             Charles Thurber developed multiple patents starting in 1843 to aid the blind.

VinegarValentinePoem

The TypewriterMYER c1910-Postcard

            Another Italian inventor, Giuseppe Ravizza created a prototype his called Scribe, a harpsichord machine for writing with keys that the person could see what they were typing in 1855.

In 1861, a Brazilian priest, Francisco João de Azevedo, made his own typewriter using wood and knives.

              In 1865, a Rector from Denmark, Rasmus Malling-Hansen invented his Hansen Writing Ball which was manufactured in 1870 and was the first typewriter sold commercially and still in use up to 1909. Malling-Hansen was consided to be the inventor of the first “electric” typewriter, though the world would not see the REAL “first” electric typewriter which was produced by the Blickensderfer Manufacturing Company, of Stamford, Connecticut, until 1902.

(I had to add this since

 I write books!)

              Two of the men and staunch supporters of the typewriter as well as their own work on it leading to the eventual success of it in the 1880s were James Densmore and George W. N. Yost. They recognized the great result Sholes’s had made back in 1867 and purchased Sholes’s patents for about $12,000. Not a small amount in their day. They were successful in convincing Remington and Sons in New York who made guns, sewing machines and farm aquipment in their factory to manufacture the first typewriters known as the Sholes and Gliden Type-Writer. It was a QWERTYT keyboard and the one we still use today. At the time the Sholes and Gliden Type-Writer cost $125 each.

              I know there are many names I do not name here because to do so, I would be writing, or typewriting a book. A great thanks to all those who continue to image what could be for up until this inventions all writing by writers, authors, novelists, historians, speechwriters etc was written by hand.

© 2016  by J.D. Holiday

If you took the time to read this you might want to read more about the typewriter.

Here are some link for you to visit.

I added for fun. 😀