Cereal Authors, GENRES, Karen Vaughan, Sci-Fi, Uncategorized

ALL THINGS SCI-FI A YOU WANTED TO KNOW BLOG BY KAREN VAUGHAN

SPACE IS THE FINAL FRONTIER AND THERE IS NO GREATER ADVENTURE THAN SAILING THROUGH THE STARS WITH YOUR FAVE SCIENCE FICTION BOOK.  IF YOU ARE A PURIST ISAAC ASIMOV AND ROBERT HEINLEIN ARE AMONGST YOUR FAVORITE AUTHORS.  LETS DEFINE SCIENCE FICTION TO THOSE WHO HAVE NEVER EXPERIENCED READING IT. (THESE PEOPLE ARE MISSING SOMETHING GREAT!)

SO WHAT IS A SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL ANYWAY?–

Science fiction (often shortened to Sci-Fi or SF) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life.—GOOGLE

“Science fiction” is difficult to define, as it includes a wide range of subgenres and themesJames Blish wrote: “Wells used the term originally to cover what we would today call ‘hard’ science fiction, in which a conscientious attempt to be faithful to already known facts (as of the date of writing) was the substrate on which the story was to be built, and if the story was also to contain a miracle, it ought at least not to contain a whole arsenal of them.”[3]

Isaac Asimov said: “Science fiction can be defined as that branch of literature which deals with the reaction of human beings to changes in science and technology.”[4] According to Robert A. Heinlein, “a handy short definition of almost all science fiction might read: realistic speculation about possible future events, based solidly on adequate knowledge of the real world, past and present, and on a thorough understanding of the nature and significance of the scientific method.

Lester del Rey wrote, “Even the devoted aficionado—or fan—has a hard time trying to explain what science fiction is”, and that the reason for there not being a “full satisfactory definition” is that “there are no easily delineated limits to science fiction.”[6] Author and editor Damon Knight summed up the difficulty, saying “science fiction is what we point to when we say it”, while author Mark C. Glassy argues that the definition of science fiction is like the definition of pornography: you do not know what it is, but you know it when you see it.–WIKIPEDIA

SOME ELEMENTS OF SCI-FI

Science fiction elements can include:

  • Temporal settings in the future, or in alternative histories.
  • Spatial settings or scenes in outer space, on other worlds, in subterranean earth, or in parallel universes
  • Characters that include aliens, mutants, robots, enhanced humans and other predicted or imagined beings.
  • Speculative or predicted technology such as brain-computer interface, bio-engineering, super-intelligent computers, ray guns and other advanced weapons.
  • Undiscovered scientific possibilities such as teleportation, time travel, and faster-than-light travel or communication.
  • New and different political and social systems and situations, including utopian, dystopian, post-apocalyptic, or post-scarcity.
  • Future history and evolution of humans on earth or on other planets.
  • Paranormal abilities such as mind control, telepathy, and telekinesis (e.g. “The Force” in Star Wars [20]).

HARD VS SOFT SCI-FI

While many beautiful entries in the science fiction universe do bend the rules about what is or isn’t possible in our physical universe (see Star Wars and the Force), much science fiction is actually based in science. This is hard science fictionHard science fiction exists inside the realm of scientific possibility. 

10 BRILLIANT HARD SCI-FI NOVELS

Soft science fiction, or soft SF, is a category of science fiction with two different definitions. It either (1) explores the “soft” sciences, and especially the social sciences (for example, anthropology, sociology, or psychology), rather than engineering or the “hard” sciences (for example, physics, astronomy, or chemistry), or (2) is not scientifically accurate.[1] Soft science fiction of either type is often more concerned with character and speculative societies, rather than speculative science or engineering.[2] It is the opposite of hard science fiction. The term first appeared in the late 1970s and is attributed to Australian literary scholar Peter Nicholls.

31 Best Soft Science Fiction Books

IF I WERE TO PICK A CATEGORY I WOULD SIDE WITH SOFT SCI FI–THERE IS A WIDER ABILITY TO MIX IN DIFFERENT ELEMENTS LIKE ROMANCE AND FANTASY.  FOR THAT TYPE OF SCIFI I WOULD RECOMMEND THE LONE WOLF SERIES BY DELLANI OAKES. SHE SAYS SHE LOVES WRITING SCIFI/FANTASY BECAUSE ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE. SHE INVENTED SENTIENT SHIPS (THEY WERE ALIVE), A RACE OF CAT PEOPLE WHO ARE FIERCE WARRIORS, AN ANCIENT EVIL SPECIES CALLED THE KAHLEA. HER MAIN CHARACTER WIL VANLIPSIG IS A GENETICALLY ALTERED SUPER SOLDIER WHO APPEARS TO BE A TOTAL BAD ASS BUT WHEN IT COMES TO HIS FRIENDS AND HIS WIFE MATILDA HE IS THE BIGGEST TEDDY BEAR.  THERE IS A LOT OF HUMOR AND STEAMY ROMANCE INVOLVED AS WELL.pizap.com14962440592221.jpg

MY FAVE DYSTOPIAN NOVELS INCLUDE-THE GIVER BY LOIS LOWRY, THE HUNGER GAMES TRILOGY BY SUZANNE COLLINS AND THE DIVERGENT TRILOGY BY VERONICA ROTH

Image result   0545265355(1)Image result

I COULD GO INTO MORE DETAIL BUT I HIGHLY RECOMMEND YOU TRY SCI-FI ON FOR SIZE YOURSELF AND SEE WHAT YOU LIKE.  DIVE IN  AND DRIFT AMONGST THE STARS !!!!

CEREAL AUTHORS WHO WRITE SCIFI-HEATHER POINSETT DUNBAR, STEPHANIE OSBORNE AND DELLANI OAKES

SOURCES OF INFORMATION PROVIDED BY GOOGLE AND WIKIPEDIA

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Amanda Thrasher, Article, author, Book Marketing, Book Trailers and Teasers, books, Cereal Authors, educators, Fiction, Life, Literary, publishing, Sharing, Social media, Uncategorized

A Shocking Diagnosis Produces One of the Author’s Most Memorable Novels to Date

50 HOURS by Loree Lough

If ever a book was predestined to be written by an individual, it was 50 HOURS by best-selling author Loree Lough. You will indeed find a piece of the author in between each page. Loree, healthy at the time she was commissioned to write the novel, was diagnosed with a similar terminal illness as her main character! The shocking diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma allowed her to write one of her most memorable novels to date. It is not by any means a depressing story that smacks of defeat or worse self-pity, but of all things, is a story of redemption, peace, second chances, friendship, forgiveness and of course, LOVE!

The famous novelist Catherine Lanigan of Romancing the Stone, Jewel of the Nile, and a multitude of other works, wrote, “This is the kind of book that wins Pulitzer prizes,” the highest compliment for any literary fiction novel.

Loree, admittedly, found it challenging at times to write 50 HOURS and early on confessed to Kevin James O’Neill, the screenplay writer the novel is based upon and a movie producer, that she wasn’t sure if she could handle the story or workload. However, for over a year and a half, through twice-daily chemo, plus a stem cell transplant, Loree could not get the characters out of her head and had the overwhelming desire to finish the novel. Wanting more than ever to show readers whose lives had been touched by this dreaded disease, cancer, that, “There’s always plenty of reason to hope and have something to be thankful for,” Loree forged ahead.

The realization that millions of others were facing the same prognosis as her self and her main character, Loree decided to put one foot in front of the other and keep moving forward. For her, it was cathartic, and she hoped it would be for her readers—not just cancer patients and their families—too. Loree has always believed she was fairly tough; living by the “Never let ’em see ya sweat” and “Never let ’em see ya cry” codes, and continued to think that way as she poured her heart and soul into her novel through her characters Aubrey, Franco, and Dusty.

Aubrey is living with the constant knowledge that her life is slowly ebbing to an end, but she’s determined to squeeze as much joy from every precious moment she has left. Still, she’s lonely, exhausted, and no matter how hard she tries to hide it, terrified! Meeting Franco gives Aubrey a thread of hope to grasp onto, as she realizes that her long-held dream of painting autumn, in of all places Savannah, has come true with his help. Franco, burdened by the belief that he’s partially responsible for the car wreck that killed his wife, turned him into a man who eked out his existence by merely putting one foot in front of the other because he doesn’t know what else to do. After meeting Aubrey, whose zest for life is infectious, his 50 hours of community service tick by, as he finds himself drawn to her strength.

Loree found herself putting words into Aubrey’s mouth, that she’d only ever said in the privacy of her own mind. Talking with her fellow patients proved she wasn’t alone: A lot of cancer patients keep things to themselves. They do it to spare their loved ones, already worried and afraid of an uncertain future, who aren’t entirely sure or know how to comfort their loved ones. Through Aubrey, Loree was able to tell them that she expected nothing, quite literally, except to be with them (her family and friends). It isn’t easy watching someone you care about suffering the side effects of drugs and treatments. Loree, through Aubrey, showed friends and family that she appreciated their steadfastness. Aubrey’s relationship with Franco and her mother helped her make that point.

Her research and interviews proved there are far too many “loved ones” like Aubrey’s ex-husband; Michael who put on a good show of being the dutiful spouse…until the condition, like Aubrey’s, deteriorated, taking the spotlight off him and putting it back on her. It’s an ugly fact, but a fact nonetheless: The occasional loved one will leave. Through Aubrey, Loree hoped to show cancer patients and family members alike that they can survive even that!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Once upon a time, best-selling author Loree Lough (literally) sang for her supper, performing before packed audiences throughout the U.S. Now and then, she blows the dust from her 6-string to croon a tune or two for her grandchildren but mostly, she just writes full time. Over the years, her stories have earned nearly 100 industry and “Readers’ Choice” awards, 7 movie options, and over eighty 4- and 5-star reviews. There are NEARLY seven million copies of Loree’s books in circulation, and by year-end of 2018, she’ll have 119 books (fiction and non-fiction for kids and adults) 72 short stories, 2,500+ articles in print. Loree shares her [i]learned-the-hard-way[/i] lessons about the craft and the industry, and her comedic approach makes her a favorite (and frequent) guest of writers’ organizations, book clubs, private and government institutions, college and high school writing programs both here and abroad. A writer who believes in “giving back,” Loree dedicates a portion of her income to Soldiers’ Angels, Special Operations Warrior Foundation, and other worthwhile organizations. She splits her time between her home in the Baltimore suburbs and a cabin in the Allegheny Mountains, and shares both with her real-life hero Larry, who rarely complains, even when she adds yet another item to her vast collection of lighthouses, wind chimes, and “wolf stuff.”

Spreading the word about this book increases the opportunity for Kevin James O’Neill to take make it a feature film as intended. Royalties from 50 HOURS go toward Cancer Research. Specifically, the Multiple Myeloma ResearchFoundation.

50 HOURS is available wherever books are sold including Amazon

Barnes and Noble 
Publisher Progressive Rising Phoenix Press
For media, author interview, and review copy requests contact the publisher: contact@progressiverisingphoenix.com

BOOK TRAILER FOR 50 HOURS

Article Copyright © 2018 by Amanda M. Thrasher 

 

author, books, Cereal Authors, JD Holiday, Truth, As Strange As Fiction, writer's life

Truth, As Strange As Fiction: Bothered, Part 1

Truth, As Strange As Fiction: Bothered, Part 1

by JD Holiday

©May 2018

         staircase   When I was thirteen I was called out of my class by the principal, Mr. Carrolio. The principal led the way ahead of me into the main stairwell. We were probably going down to his office. I thought, isn’t that where you ended up if you’ve done something wrong, and where the principal can yell at you, you hope, without others hearing it. This was embarrassing.

              But this was even worse for me. Mr. Carrolio was not only the principal but was a friend of my aunt and uncle’s. This was not a good thing to be happening, especially since I didn’t know what I had done. I was mortified.

              As far as I knew no one had ever been pulled out of my class by the principal before. But it happened to me.

              He was ahead of me in the stairwell, and half way down he stopped and turned to look at me.

              “Where you out with Leslie last night?” He said, though he used Leslie’s last name too.

              I was glad we weren’t moving down the stairs because I was sure I would have stumbled and falled down them just then. And I didn’t know if I gasped out loud at the question though I thought my mouth opened and some sound came out. How did he know I was with Leslie last night? My knees quivered in fear and my nose began to run. I had to wipe it with my hand.

              I was always willing to do whatever a friend wants to do for the most part. I wasn’t looking to get in trouble. I never liked it when my parents were disappointed but when Leslie said we were going to kiss boys that was exciting to me. I had never kissed a boy before. I needed the experience.

               I didn’t think we did anything wrong. Yet Mr. Carrolio asking about it seem to imply it was. How did he learn about it, I wondered while not being able to turn away from his stare. After all, he was an adult. I was taught to respect them.

              I shakingly said, “yes,” to his question was I with Leslie last night.

              “Did the boys kiss you?” he asked watching my face. The boys he was referring to were two black boys from the eighth grade. Now, my brain screamed; maybe my parents wouldn’t want me kissing boys. Though I didn’t know for sure. I never talked to them about that kind of thing. Then I thought, if he tells my parents, or worse, tell my aunt, she would make a bigger deal of it, I would have to have that conversation with them. Even more humiliating.

              Last night after dinner I met Leslie, but the excitement vanished with a kiss. We TSP 1960 Chathammet the two boys under the the overpass along Route 80. It was a deserted place with the only sounds were of the vehicles above racing along on the highway. It turned out to be a crude experience. First there were some weak hellos with the boys on one side and Leslie and me facing them. Then, with some shuffling back and forth by all, the boys just leaned forward to kiss the girl opposite. The one kissing me crushed his lips to mine for maybe ten seconds, and that was it. I hadn’t yet formed an opinion of kissing when that boy declared, “She doesn’t know how to kiss.”

              Leslie gave out a short giggle. And the boys turned and walked away. From excitement to dismal now, I just wanted to go home. Leslie said nothing about it and I was thankful.

              From five years old, until the Beatles came to the USA, I was in love with Johnny Mathis. We owned one album each from Johnny Mathis, The Ink Spots, The Platters, Frank Sinatra, and after November 1963, one album of speeches by John F. Kennedy. I would put Johnny’s on the record player playing it over again until my mother said to stop. She never told me Johnny was black.

              I stammered, “yes,” to his question about the boys kissing us feeling sick.

              “Were you petting?” he asked.

              “What’s that?” I was frowning.

              “Did they touch your body?” he inserted.

              “No,” I said, why should they was my next thought. And anyway, it was early fall and though not so cold I was wearing my heavy winter coat because my mother said it was going to get colder. It was a hand-me-down red duffle coatm a give a way from one of my father’s more wealthy tax clients who thought his five children needed more clothes than we could afford. My father was an accountant. He charged every one seven dollars no matter who they were. Companies paid fifteen dollars. But, anyhow, touching would have been hard to do with that old coat over my slight build.

              Mr. Carrolio just stared at me for what must have been a minute, I think, before he said, “You can go back to class.”

              I bolted back up the stairs. My classroom was the first room on the left at top of the landing. As I entered the classroom I felt on display. Every one of my classmates turned to stare at me like they knew all about it. Mr. Tamorino paused a second then went on talking as I slipped back into my seat, my face hot.

 

NEXT time on Truth, As Strange As Fiction:

Bothered, Part 2:  More Teenage angst

JD’s Site:   http://jdholiday.blogspot.com/

 JD’s Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/J.D.-Holiday/e/B002G1GOKQ/

Cereal Authors

Character Quotes from Lone Wolf Tales – A Little White Lie by Dellani

character-quotes-imageBen took up the list pointing to each name in order. He repeated the process for a few moments, and eventually lit on one name, highlighted it and handed the scanner back to Wil.

“Ishanti Abrams? Who the hell is he?”

“She,” Ben replied. “No idea.”

“What made you pick her then?”

“My four friends.”

Wil frowned. Ben held up his right hand, back toward Wil.

“Eenie, meenie, minie and mo.” He lowered one finger with each word until only the middle finger was extended. Brandishing it, then snapping a cocky salute, he turned on his heel and left the room.

© 2018 Dellani Oakes

To Buy Dellani’s Books

For More About Dellani

white lie cover

Lone Wolf Tales is a Collection of 9 Short Stories and Novellas from my Sci-Fi universe.

Amanda Thrasher, Article, author, Book Marketing, books, Cereal Authors, chapter books,, Children's story, educators, Fiction, Life, Literary, parents, publishing, Sharing, Social media, Teens, tweens, writer's life, YA

TLA 18 – What’s this all about?

Signing copies of Bitter Betrayal in the featured author area at TLA 18.

Sooooooo the coolest thing that I believe as an author, Amanda M. Thrasher, and organization, Progressive Rising Phoenix Press, that we are a part of on an annual basis is the TLA (Texas Library Association) Conference. I have attended this conference for years, signed as a featured author for at least five years, and we have committed as a publisher, for now, four years.

Being an author first, and a co-owner and CEO of an independent press founded by authors, we continually try to locate and find ways that bring the most ‘bang for our buck’ for our authors. What exactly does that mean when it comes to TLA? In case you are not familiar with TLA, it is a professional organization promoting librarianship and library services in Texas. Through legislative advocacy, continuing education events, and networking channels. The conference usually has between 5000 to 6500 attendees, if not more, and often consist of librarians (academic, public, and private), educators, consumers, category buyers, publishers, vendors, to name a few. 

Being that it takes place during the week, most attendees go on their companies time and dime. This is good for us, (publishers and authors) because the visitors are pre-registered and literally plan up to a year in advance to attend the conference which brings a different type of ‘crowd’ versus people just look for something entertaining to do. So what do all of those people do?

Signing ‘The Greenlee Project’ at TLA 18

Everyone attends sessions as they listen and learn about new techniques, equipment, products, and don’t forget they all get to network and socialize as well. Meeting the authors is always a big draw, especially the featured authors, and so many fantastic publishers are represented such as Penguin Random House, Scholastic, McMillan, Disney, Chronicle Books, Capstone, Hachette Book Group, Simon & Schuster, Little, Brown, Book Co., to name a few…. Oh yeah, and us 🙂 as well, Progressive Rising Phoenix Press.

I am not big on the author to author events (me personally), that become book swaps. However, I will always tell our authors, or any other that ask, that I believe in this particular trade conference. This one is worth saving your $’s for and vesting in the trip. It moves yearly, location, but is always in Texas. We network; share our work with the librarians, teachers, and readers. Sign books, and pick up book orders. I have attended and signed at ALA, BEA, and TLA. For us, PRPP, I still believe we receive the most value for our vested dollars in this event. If you have ever considered going, as a company, but you are not sure if it is worth it or if you are an author and you do not know if you should spend the dollars here are my top reasons for doing so:

1) It is a professional trade show; attendees are pre-registered, and that means a guaranteed X amount of participation.

2) Attendees are there with a purpose to do the following: Place book orders for their locations, receive free books for review, and to share new talent or books with their districts. If you have a new title or an old title with limited exposure, it is the perfect place to share your work with the experts or potential real buyers.

3) It is expensive, yes, but with a joint effort it can be done and is worth the $’s spent due to the added benefit of buyers, readers, vendors, librarians, educators, all under one roof at the same time.

4) Networking with different schools, librarians, teachers, readers, is priceless, especially when they are all book lovers and want to be there with you.

5) We have placed multiple bulk orders through this conference, introduced new titles and authors, and re-launched older titles.

6) Negotiated contracts for services authors cannot receive on their own, such as Lexile scoring, contact made through TLA.

7) Received great submissions & we do not solicit authors.

8) Met librarians, teachers, educators, and others that we have stayed in touch with and shared our catalog, and new titles over the year. They have come back, and picked our latest work, sharing it with their districts.

9) Featured author area: the authors are reviewed and scheduled to sign. The advertising is great, and visiting with people as you sign your work is fantastic, but having them come back year after year, remembering you from the year before as they look for your new work….is…..priceless.

10) Often it seems as if we accomplish more at this one trade show than at ten regular author events. Those often seem time-consuming, turn into author swaps, and end up with minimal unit sales.

TLA

Copyright © Amanda M. Thrasher 

Amanda M.Thrasher

Progressive Rising Phoenix Press

Cereal Authors, Character Quotes, humor, Karen Vaughan

GUS EXPLAINS CATS A QUOTE FROM GUS’S LIFE-A DOGS EYE VIEW OF HIS WORLD

goldenretrievers3

Okay here are the bare facts. The ugly truth; I am a dog! I guess it could have been worse; I could have been born a cat. Now there’s a bad attitude and a waste of fur if ever I saw one. With dogs, you always know where you stand. Cats have a hidden agenda. Always appear like they couldn’t care less. Let me tell you this people! IT’S A FREAKIN’ BIG LIE!!!!!!!!!! CATS DO CARE!!! IF IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT THEM, YOU PAY FOR IT BIG TIME!

 

author, books, Cereal Authors, Excerpts, Fantasy, Fiction, Ruth Davis Hays, Uncategorized

The Dawnstone Tale – excerpt

by R.L.Davis Hays

Chapter 1 continues:

Ruth Davis Hays Book Cover Collage 1

“Have I ever failed to pay you?” Keinigan protested. The knife held at his throat was making it difficult to talk with bravado.

The thieves of The Slider Guild were sincere in their threat of cutting him if he did not produce the money, but they were not merciless to those that kept their word, and Keinigan had always made sure they were on the top of his debt list. To not pay them after they had given him their aid was worthy of a knife in the back.

He made it to the safehouse without pursuit. Yet, the gate to sanctuary was a perilous one. The thieves did not care for people to burst in unannounced and fresh out of a jailbreak.

Novak, a burly human with one eye and a long, ugly scar down his neck, held Keinigan pinned beside the door with one arm. The other arm gripped the jagged knife, warm from being next to the small of his back, against Keinigan’s golden skin.

“But, you don’t have the silver on you. Do you, Keen?”

The query came from a thin, dark-skinned woman lounging calmly at a table in the far corner of the tavern. She could have been considered pretty if it were not for the hard, cruel expression that always sat on her face. It was clear from the respect that all others in the room gave her that she was their leader. She had not even moved since Keinigan arrived in a flush of excitement; nevertheless, he knew the only real threat came from her. She could order his life taken with the bat of one black eyelash.

“Do you, Keen?” she repeated, skeptical. Using Keinigan’s guild name was a show of authority and the ominous tone caused the blade of Novak’s knife to sink in a little closer. The guild was determined to extract a payment or, at least, secure the promise of one.

Keinigan made a depreciating gesture. “No, it’s true I have nothing on me, Gala.” He called her by her guild name as well to try evening the odds. “But, I’ll double the price if you cover me for tonight. I swear.”

There was silence from the corner. Then her face broke into a crooked smile. “You are such a filthy liar,” Gala cackled as she waved Novak away.

The knife withdrew and the tension in the room eased. Keinigan rubbed his throat and glared at the lumbering human. They were deemed equals now and he was allowed to be indignant. Moving over to Gala, the fae slid down into a chair opposite to make his offer.

“Look, you know I’m good for at least the price of two days’ hiding. I can get more if you want it.” He smoothed his tunic and settled into his most charming attitude. “Come now, Gala. What’s better for you? Twenty silver pents now or an extra ten added to that later? You wouldn’t even have to let the Silvermen know about it.”

Her brow creased in mock anger. “Wait. Ten extra? You said you’d double the twenty. Swindler.”

He spread his hands over the tabletop. “Like I could really get my hands on forty silver pents.”

Gala shook her head, her mouth turned up on end with a smirk. “I know you too well, Keinigan.”

“Thirty, then?”

“I know you; it’ll take you forever to scrape it up. Just give us the regular twenty and I’ll forget what I heard about cheating the Slider’s guildmaster.”

Keinigan lowered his head with a smile. He knew it was a gentle reprimand coming from her. However, a little bribe is never out of place.

“How about if I give you something that the guild won’t mind missing out on…”

Her eyes narrowed in suspicion. “Like what?”

His hand stole across the table to gently pick hers up and play with the fingers. He raised his slanted, green eyes up to her with a lustful promise simmering in them.

“Oh,” he purred. “I’m sure the Silvermen won’t mind a little reminiscing between two old friends.” He leaned in closer as he saw her opening to the suggestion. “Two good friends. We could go down to the hide-room and –”

His offer got cut short by a movement near the window. One of the thieves stood up and peeked out the glass.

“Torches approaching,” was all they heard.

The room cleared.

 

******************************************

Translations from Jorthus series available from Amazon.com. Visit the author page for more information on the books, or join the conversation on The Worlds of Jorthus page on Facebook.  http://rldavishays.webs.com/apps/blog/

Cereal Authors, Romance

DECONSTRUCTING ROMANCE NOVELS

LAST MONTH I TALKED ABOUT COZY MYSTERIES THIS MONTH I TAKE ON THE ROMANCE GENRE.

WIKIPEDIA DESCRIBES THE ROMANCE NOVEL AS FOLLOWS

The romance novel or romantic novel discussed in this article is the mass-market literary genreNovels of this type of genre fictionplace their primary focus on the relationship and romantic love between two people, and must have an “emotionally satisfying and optimistic ending.”[1] There are many subgenres of the romance novel including fantasyhistorical romanceparanormal fiction, and science fictionWalter Scott defined the literary fiction form of romance as “a fictitious narrative in prose or verse; the interest of which turns upon marvellous and uncommon incidents”.[2][3]

A thriving genre of works conventionally referred to as “romance novels” existed in ancient Greece.[4] Some scholars see precursors to modern genre fiction romance novels in literary fiction of the 18th and 19th centuries, including Samuel Richardson‘s sentimental novelPamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740) and the novels of Jane Austen.[5]

Austen inspired Georgette Heyer, the British author of historical romance set around the time Austen lived, as well as detective fiction, who technically created the subgenre Regency Romance.[citation needed] Heyer’s first romance novel, The Black Moth (1921), was set in 1751.

The British company Mills and Boon began releasing escapist fiction for women in the 1930s. Their books were sold in North America by Harlequin Enterprises Ltd, which began direct marketing to readers and allowing mass-market merchandisers to carry the books.[citation needed]

Category romance[edit]

Harlequin novels

Category romances are short, usually no more than 200 pages, or about 55,000 words.

To write a successful novel of this length, the “author must pare the story down to its essentials. Subplots and minor characters are eliminated or relegated to the backstory.

Single-title romances

Single-titles novels are romance novels not published as part of a publisher’s category. They are longer than category romances, typically between 350 and 400 pages, or 100,000-110,000 words. Publishers may release the novels over a shorter period of time for sales and publicity reasons, but on average authors write 1.5 novels per year and have one each year published. Single-title novels remain on the booksellers’ shelves at the discretion of the store.

Despite their name, single-title novels are not always stand alone novels. Some authors prefer to write several interconnected books, ranging in number from trilogies to long-running series, so that they can revisit characters or worlds. Such sets of books often have similar titles, and may be labelled as “Number 1 in the XXX Series”, but they are not considered series romances because they are not part of a particular line.

Contemporary Romance is define as any romance taking place after WWII. There are several subgenres in this category.

Romantic suspense 

Romantic suspense involves an intrigue or mystery for the protagonists to solve. typically, however, the heroine is the victim of a crime or attempted crime, and works with a hero, who tends to be in a field where he would serve as a protector, such as a police officer, FBI agent, bodyguard, or Navy SEAL.By the end of the novel, the mystery is resolved and the interaction between the hero and heroine has evolved into a solid relationship.These novels primarily take place in contemporary times, but authors such as Amanda Quick have broadened the genre to also include historical time frames.

Like all romances, romantic suspense novels must place the development of a relationship between the protagonists at the heart of the story. The relationship “must impact each decision they make and increase the tension of the suspense as it propel the story. In turn, the events of suspense must also directly affect the relationship and move the story forward.” Romantic suspense novels tend to have more “clean” language, without the “emotional, intimate” descriptions often used in more traditional romances.Because the mystery is a crucial aspect of the plot, these novels are more plot-driven instead of character-driven.

This blend of the romance and mystery was perfected by Mary Stewart, who wrote ten romantic suspense novels between 1955 and 1967. Stewart was one of the first to seamlessly combine the two genres, maintaining a full mystery while focusing on the courtship between two people. In her novels, the process of solving the mystery “helps to illuminate” the hero’s personality, helping the heroine to fall in love with him.

ONE OF MY FAVORITE ROMANTIC SUSPENSE AUTHORS IS AN INDIE AUTHOR DELLANI OAKES 

 

THEY CONTAIN FANTASTIC PLOTS WHERE THE GOOD GUY ALWAYS WINS, THE BADASSES GET WHATS COMING TO THEM AND THEY ARE ARE FIREWORKS BETWEEN THE LEADS. THE WOMEN ARE STRONG CHARACTERS BUT DO NEED GUYS LIKE TEAGUE MCMURTRY, AN EX-MILITARY TO SWOOP IN AND LEND A HAND.  THERE IS OFTEN STEAMY SEX IN THIS NOVELS AS WELL.

YOU CAN FIND DELLANIS ROMANCES AT AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/Dellani-Oakes/e/B007ZQCW3A

PARANORMAL ROMANCE

This genre can be contemporary where their is a supernatural aspect like shape shifters, vampires, werewolves and fey oh my. 

DEFINITION FROM WIKIPEDIA

Paranormal romance blends the real with the fantastic or science fictional. The fantastic elements may be woven into an alternate version of our own world in an urban fantasyinvolving vampires, demons, and/or werewolves, or they may be more “normal” manifestations of the paranormal—humans with psychic abilities, witches, or ghosts. Time travel, futuristic, and extraterrestrial romances also fall beneath the paranormal umbrella.These novels often blend elements of other subgenres—including suspense, mystery, or chick lit—with their fantastic themes.A few paranormals are set solely in the past and are structured much like any historical romance novel. Others are set in the future, sometimes on different worlds. Still others have a time-travel element with either the hero or the heroine traveling into the past or the future.Between 2002 and 2004, the number of paranormal romances published in the United States doubled to 170 per year. A popular title in the genre can sell over 500,000 copies.

Many paranormal romances rely on the blend of contemporary American life with the existence of supernatural or magically empowered beings, human or otherwise; sometimes the larger culture is aware of the magical in its midst, sometimes it is not. Some paranormal romances focus less on the specifics of their alternative worlds than do traditional science fiction or fantasy novels, keeping the attention strongly on the underlying romance.Others develop the alternate reality meticulously, combining well-planned magical systems and inhuman cultures with contemporary reality.

PARANORMAL ROMANCES I LOVE  BOOKS BY DARLENE KUNCYTES

 

DARLENES PARANORMAL ROMANCES ARE AVAILABLE AT AMAZON

 https://www.amazon.com/Darlene-Kuncytes/e/B00BIO0EJY

HISTORICAL ROMANCE AS DEFINED IN WIKIPEDIA

Historical romance (also historical novel) is a broad category of fiction which the plot takes place in a setting located in the past, which Walter Scott helped popularize in the early 19th-century, with works such as Rob Roy and Ivanhoe. Literary fiction historical romances continue to be published, and a notable recent example is Wolf Hall (2009), a multi-award-winning novel by English historical novelist Hilary Mantel. However, the focus here is on the mass-market genre.

This subgenre includes a wide variety of other subgenres, including Regency romance. Mass-market historical romance novels are rarely published in hardcover, with fewer than 15 receiving that status each year, less than one-fifth of the number of contemporary romance novels published in that format. Because historical romances are primarily published in mass-market format, their fortunes are tied to a certain extent to the mass-market trends. Booksellers and large merchandisers now sell fewer mass market paperbacks, preferring trade paperbacks or hardcovers, which prevents historical romances from being sold in some price clubs and other mass merchandise outlets.

In 2001, 778 mass-market historical romances were published, a 10-year high. By 2004, the annual number had dropped to 486, which was still 20% of all romance novels published. Kensington Books says they receive fewer submissions of historical novels, and their previously published authors have switched to contemporary.

I HAVE READ MY FAIR SHARE OF WHAT I LIKE TO CALL BODICE RIPPERS, A GOOD FRIEND REFERS TO THEM AS TRASHY NOVELS WHERE THE DAMSEL IS KIDNAPPED BY SOME KIND OF ROGUE LIKE A PIRATE AND OUR HERO A MUSCLE BOUND BARECHESTED MAN RESEMBLING FABIO OR SOME GREEK ADONIS SWEEPS IN TO SAVE THE LADIES VIRTUE ONLY TO RAVAGE HER LOVINGLY LATER IN THE STORY. THERE IS A HAPPILY EVER AFTER AND THE COUPLE IS WED AND MAKES LOADS OF BABIES.

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THATS THE ABCS OF ROMANCE THERE ARE OTHER SUB GENRES OF ROMANCE THAT ARE DEFINED IN WIKIPEDIA

Amanda Thrasher, Article, books, Cereal Authors, Children's story, childrens stories, educators, Fiction, Life, Literary, parents, publishing, Sharing, Social media

What was your proudest professional moment?

Many of us belong to groups including social media groups. Often added without our knowledge, some groups I know nothing about the subject matter at all, and yet there I am, added. I won’t lie; I spend very little time socializing online, socializing period. I’m not necessarily an unsocial person, but like most people these days I’m spread pretty thin, and I’m incredibly busy. Between my family, personal writing time, and work, spare time is a real issue. But recently a social media group sent out a question that ended up in my inbox, and it caught my attention. It was a great question, which made me stop, read the question and think.

What was your proudest professional moment?

I thought about that question for several minutes. We all have proud personal moments, kids and family rising to the top of the list. But the proudest professional moment, I hadn’t given that particular question much thought till right then.

I think on a personal, professional level, having Barnes and Noble Small Press Division, NY, at one-time purchasing three of my titles, little author, and a small press was a huge professional moment for me. They don’t stay there long, store category buyers list, and it’s not the same as .com. line. That was a huge accomplishment at the time, knowing we have great titles with sales under their belts, large author platforms, that have been declined over and over again for the category buyer store purchase. That ranked pretty high for me, as an author, as a proud professional moment. Starting a business with my business partner, a press founded by authors, in a competitive industry and personally being invited to discuss our company with our print managers at LSI/Ingram in TN was huge. Touring the plant, negotiating a contract that was feasible for us as a company and beneficial for our authors was also a proud professional moment. But one of the proudest moments I can remember, professionally, was the day I received a letter from a Site Director, Jeremy McNair, for one of the after-school programs that he managed at an elementary school on behalf of another organization. I had been asked to conduct a month-long workshop with multiple sites. Listed as one of my locations the letter stated the following:

Dear Amanda,

My name is Jeremy McNair, and I am the Site Director for the YMCA program at Butler Elementary School. This past Monday, you came and spoke to my students about your book and the writing processes behind them. The past two days since then have been completely filled with the kids telling me how much they learned and enjoyed your presentation. I wish I could take the time to tell you every story, but I’ve typed up several of the letters that they’ve written to you and copied them to the end of this email. Your drive and passion were well received and noted by all the children and staff, and I know that your impact will resonate in a huge way in all of their lives.

Thank you so much for your dedication to your craft, but even more than that, thank you for sharing it with the children at Butler. They were left truly inspired.

Sincerely,

Jeremy McNair

This touched me in such a way, as did the letters from the students below (read them, and you’ll see what I mean, precious) that it reminded me of why authors/writers do what we do. Why we share our work, spend time, and encourage our future young writers to tap into and use their imagination to create beautiful future works. Over the years I’ve participated, completed, and accomplished many things that other people would be proud of, but this to this day ranks as one of my proudest professional moments.

Letters from the students below (they’re in a laminate paper for protection) but click on the image to enlarge and read.

Amanda M Thrasher Website

Article, author, books, Cereal Authors, JD Holiday, Writing Process

Text-To-Speech: An Editing Tool

           Text-To-Speech: An Editing Tool by JD Holiday

Reading apps are not just for you to read Ebooks. Text-to-Speech software or apps, TTS, are intuitive apps that read to you. This is a good way to proofread and spot then easily correct mistakes in your own manuscripts, articles and school papers for anyone not just people with dyslexia.

Of course, some of you might know this already but for those of you who don’t, this can be a stroke of luck. Imagine listening to your own words read back to you before anyone else has read it. For me, hearing my own words read to me was a treat.

BUT there was a great benefit. I was able to hear any mistakes and fix them easily. Now, my main problem is switching words, a problem caused by dyslexia. I might type where or were for here or there. OR, what for that, or and for can. Really. It is a mystery to me even. It’s a problem that has to be weeded out of my manuscripts. So Text-to-Speech software is just what I needed.

I tried a few Text-to-Speech apps and found that Voice Reading (Read Aloud) by Microsoft Word worked the best for me. Microsoft developed this text-to-speech software to help people with dyslexia as well as editing. This app reads to you from these formats: EPUB, PDF, DOC, DOCX, TXT in either a male or female voice. It’s not perfect. It some cases, the borders are not aligned and you can’t move forward without clicking to the next page, which I found annoying at times, and the read voices are not all the natural.

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This is how I edited. I set the Read Aloud app to one side, and the manuscript to the other. When I hear a mistake, I stop the app and fix the problem.

Before you start looking for a text-to-speech app though, look on your devices to see if they have them as part of the operating system. I know iphones, androids, and some tablets already have some versions of a Text-to-Speech on them.

Last note:  I did try the Natural Readers free app without success. I found that their free text-to-speech app posts an ad to buy their other versions on just about every page. It flashes up and you have to delete it every time to continue the app. It also would sometimes malfunction when you tried to get it to go back a page or two.

So the FREE Voice Reading (Read Aloud) by Microsoft is worth tryingFind out more about the Voice Reading (Read Aloud) by Microsoft Word at:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/p/readaloud/9wzdncrdn3ms

©JD Holiday 2018